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History's Shadow AB1, 2010

History's Shadow AB2, 2010

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History's Shadow AB6, 2010

History's Shadow AB7, 2010

History's Shadow AB8a/b, 2010

History's Shadow AB9, 2010

History's Shadow AB14, 2010

History's Shadow AB15, 2010

History's Shadow AB16, 2010

History's Shadow AB17, 2010

History's Shadow AV1, 2010

History's Shadow AV3, 2010

History's Shadow AV4, 2010

History's Shadow AV5, 2010

History's Shadow AV6, 2010

History's Shadow AV7, 2010

History's Shadow AV10, 2010

History's Shadow AV12, 2010

History's Shadow GM2, 2010

History's Shadow GM3, 2010

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History's Shadow GM8, 2010

History's Shadow GM9, 2010

History's Shadow GM10, 2010

History's Shadow GM11, 2010

History's Shadow GM12, 2010

History's Shadow GM15, 2010

History's Shadow GM16, 2010

History's Shadow GM17, 2010

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History's Shadow GM22, 2010

History's Shadow GM25, 2010

History’s Shadow has as its source material x-rays of art objects that date from antiquity through just prior to the invention of photography. The x-rays have been culled from museum conservation archives, re-photographed and re-worked. Through the x-ray process, the artworks of origin become de-contextualized, yet acutely alive and renewed. The series concerns the dual processes and intertwined themes of memory and excavation.

Rendering three dimensions into two is at the heart of the photographic process. With the x-ray, this sense is compounded, since it maps both the inner and outer surfaces of its subject. The mysterious images that result encompass both an inner and an outer world, as the two-dimensional photographs bring us into a realm of indeterminate space, depth, and scale.

The x-ray has historically been used for the structural examination of art and artifacts much as physicians examine bones and internal organs; it reveals losses, replacements, methods of construction, and internal trauma that may not be visible to the naked eye. The resulting prints of History’s Shadow make the invisible visible, and express through photographic means the shape-shifting nature of time itself, and the continuous presence of the past contained within us.

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